Monday, March 17, 2014

Happy Anniversary, Sweetie

Four years ago Sweetie and I promised to love and honor each other in a small Methodist church in the thriving metropolis - okay, small Southern town - of Welaka. It was not exactly a shotgun wedding, but we'd lived in a pressure cooker for three weeks which is kind of the same thing. In some ways the wedding was anti-climatic. We'd felt married for a long time. What was in our hearts needed to be backed up with a preacher's blessing in order to diffuse a pretty stressful situation.

Four years ago the day started off wet and rainy just  like today. "God's way of showing us our relationship was going to grow," said my Sweetie to allay my fears of foreboding. When I look back and see how much we've grown, I have to say I married a pretty smart man!


Four years ago, we weren't concerned with picking a special day. March 17th was a day that all parties could agree on so that's the day we picked. Since we've been together Sweetie and I have amassed a variety of significant anniversaries. There's the day he winked at me on Match.com. There's the day we first met, our first official date, our first kiss, the day we moved in together, the day we said "I do" in front of a pot of peas simmering on the stove. At the beginning of our relationship I could recall each date without fail. My failing memory, however, is glad to have St. Patrick's Day to remind me of our "real"anniversary - the one we've decided to keep and let the others go. 


 Neither Sweetie nor I are Irish, but both of us are drawn to Celtic teachings. We felt a strangely familiar bond when we met. John Donohue describes this as anam cara friendship.  “The Celtic tradition recognized that an anam-cara friendship was graced with affection. Friendship awakens affection. The heart learns a new art of feeling." Sweetie and I have often wondered if sometime in a past life we were related because the Celts believed that "souls connect beyond time and space, in this life and beyond." Perhaps this bond is what makes us so compatible. Donohue notes, “The stranger does not come accidentally; he brings a particular gift and illumination.” And this is why it is said “that the “anam-cara” perspective is sublime” for “it permits us to enter this unity of ancient belonging.”

"Historically, your anam cara is a person to whom you look as the person to share, confess and reveal the hidden intimacies in your life. With your anam cara you can express your mind, your heart, the very core of your innermost self. Your friendship with your anam cara is not just a friendship, but also an act of belonging, a place of recognition. Therefore, the most powerful gift you can bring to your friendship with your anam cara is your attention and awareness. It is your responsibility to be completely present with your anam cara." You see, in Celtic tradition, as John notes, “The stranger does not come accidentally; he brings a particular gift and illumination.” And this is why it is said “that the “anam-cara” perspective is sublime” for “it permits us to enter this unity of ancient belonging.”


Sweetie, my anam cara, here's to celebrating our ancient belonging and soul connection. 
I love you more than Irish cream in your coffee, corned beef and cabbage, rolling green hills, fisherman's sweaters, little green men wearing top hats, and gold potted rainbows,  
Merry ME
** www.momentscount.com

2 comments:

Camille Olivia said...

BEAUTIFUL! Congrats on your wonderful celebration. You inspire great hope. Hugs, Bella ~

Jody said...

Happy anniversary to you and your dear love, M!

many hugs and many more loving years together for you both:)